Another Historical Fiction

I’m really sorry for the delay in posting this – it was meant to go up almost a week ago. But it’s up now, so finish reading! Here’s my review of The Kite Runner.

Taking us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy through the horrific invasion of the Taliban, The Kite Runner is the heart-breaking story of the unlikely and inseparable friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, both of whom are caught in the tragic sweep of history. It is also about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, the possibility of redemption, and the influence of fathers over sons, of a country over men – and the sacrifices, loyalty, and lies that bind them.
Set against a volatile and intensely emotional backdrop that has never been explored in fiction before,
The Kite Runner debuted to national acclaim. A multiple award winner and a #1 New York Times bestseller, it is the first Afghan novel to be written in English.

I loved this book. There was so much information, so much historical fact, but then so much emotion that went along with it. Even though it wasn’t based on a real person, it was based off of historical events, and I’m sure that this story happened at some point in the history of the world, even if it wasn’t recorded as true. The emotional baggage this story holds for Afghans and even people hearing about what happened for the first time was amazing. The author managed to send a message through not only his own language, but another one as well. The horrors of the war came alive, even before the Taliban came into the picture. The political and social climate in Afghanistan had been decaying for a while, as shown through the hostile feelings towards the Hazaras; the discrimination was distgusting, even among those who employed them.

My favorite character was most definitely Hasaan. He was brave, loyal, and forgiving, despite everything. His best friend was cowardly, but Hasaan found the strength to be a friend in times where friends could be spying on you as an enemy. The life that Hasaan lived in innocence and goodness was inspiring; I wish that I could have known him, and shown him respect that he deserved but never received in his life. I won’t say anything more, because I really want to but think that it would spoil a lot! Just know that this story was amazing, and I would highly recommend it for anyone looking to read an emotional story of love, friendship, war and its consequences, as well as the effects one man’s actions can have on the people around him. The blurb states it very accurately: “the power of reading, the price of betrayal, the possibility of redemption, and the influence of fathers over sons, of a country over men – and the sacrifices, loyalty, and lies that bind them.”

~Yours Truly

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