Weekend BookBlogger Hop: 39

The BookBlogger Hop is hosted by Billy from Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer every weekend. Basically, if you blog about books, answer a question provided and if you link to their post in your blog, you can add your blog to their list of participants. This week’s question is:

So would you read a book just because of the hype?

If I liked the description/cover of the book, then yes. But there has to be more than just “everybody’s talking about it” for me to want to read it – a direct recommendation from a family member/friend/etc., or something sparking my interest in it.

Weekend BookBlogger Hop: 38

The BookBlogger Hop is hosted by Billy from Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer every weekend. Basically, if you blog about ebooks, answer a question provided and if you link to their post in your blog, you can add your blog to their list of participants. This week’s question is:

When you are writing your reviews, do you write them as you are reading or wait until you are completely done with the book?

I always wait until I’m completely done with the book. Occasionally I’ll write the title, author, publisher, and release date beforehand, espeically if I’m reviewing a book for a specific purpose (like for an author or Netgalley or something), but usually I don’t. Also, I try to do it immediately after I finish a book so that I have all my thoughts in my head ready for the review, not trying to remember if something was from this book or from a new book that I started. I like having the book in front of me for that reason, too, and if I borrowed it from the library, sometimes waiting to write the review hurts the review. Plus, after a while, if I don’t write the review, I tend to just not review it. I actually deleted a draft of a review because I never got around to typing any more than the title on the post.

Weekend BookBlogger Hop: 37

The BookBlogger Hop is hosted by Billy from Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer every weekend. Basically, if you blog about books, answer a question provided and if you link to their post in your blog, you can add your blog to their list of participants. This week’s question is:

What is your favorite genre? (genre that you read the most) – Recommend a book!

As much as I love fantasy, I also really love realistic fiction. So I’ll recommend a book from realistic, since there’s a lot of fantasy on my blog. My favorite realistic fiction writer is Sarah Dessen. Her books The Truth About Forever and Along for the Ride are my two favorite books by her. Check ’em out!

Weekend BookBlogger Hop: 36

The BookBlogger Hop is hosted by Billy from Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer every weekend. Basically, if you blog about ebooks, answer a question provided and if you link to their post in your blog, you can add your blog to their list of participants. This week’s question is:

What is your favorite trilogy (series)?

I’d have to say that Ally Carter’s Heist Society trilogy, even though I haven’t finished the third book, is my favorite trilogy. It has adventure, suspense, an intelligent herione and a cuter-than-Adonis crush. What more could a girl want in a story?

Someone Like You

Title: Someone Like You
Author: Sarah Dessen
Publisher: Puffin Books – Penguin Group, Inc.
Release Date: May 11, 2004

Halley and Scarlett have been friends for years. People know Scarlett as the popular, flamboyant one; Halley’s just the quiet sidekick, but she doesn’t mind. The two fo them balance each other perfectly – until the beginning of their junior year. Then, Scarlett’s boyfriend Michael is killed in a motorcycle accident; soon afterward, she learns that she is carrying his baby. For the first time, Scarlett really needs Halley. Their friendship may bend under the weight, but it’ll never break – because a true friendship is a promise you keep forever.

I read this book a while ago, and am just now getting to the review, but it has stuck with me. I don’t know how Dessen takes these topics that seem so far away from me, like a teenage pregnancy, and makes it hit home, hard. Scarlett is nothing like me, and I’m not a “rebel” like Halley. But there are still parts of them that resonate with me. Like Scarlett’s fear, or Halley’s quieter tendencies, or the relationship she has with her mother. Or just simply their friendship. Whatever it is that she does, I will always be willing to pick up one of her books, of only for the feeling that there’s something in there that I need to read, whether to learn something or to be able to identify with someone, even if they’re fictional (yeah, I know that makes me sound really pathetic, but come on. Who doesn’t want to be/meet a fictional character?).

Needless to say, I loved Scarlett and Halley. Their friendship was just so real. No matter what, even if it seemed one sided at points, and that their communication skills needed drastic improvement, they were there for each other, and that is what counted. Yes, they fought, and hurt each other, but they were together in the end. It was touching, really, especially through the flashbacks of their childhood. And, even though I thought Halley had poor taste in guys, I’m glad that Macon came through for her in the end. Halley learned something from it, and it all ended up working out.

I liked how the mom was written, though. From Halley’s viewpoint, the mom was very stifling. I understood the gap between them and for the most part was on Halley’s side. However, even through that bias towards Halley, as the narrator, there were moments of clarity for the reader when I begging Halley to, just once, listen to her mother. That conflict was extremely well written, and I loved how it ended up being resolved by Scarlett. It just seemed fitting for her best friend to be the solution, even though she didn’t know it.

It was really a fantastic novel, and, like most of her books, held truths for any reader, of any age: how being true to yourself is essential; the importance of friendship; and that grief is okay. This book would be good for anyone looking for an emotional but fun book for the upcoming summer.

~Yours Truly

**Note: I recommend this book to ages 14 & up due to sexual references and scenes, as well as some profane language.

Keeping the Moon

Title: Keeping the Moon
Author: Sarah Dessen
Publisher: Speak – Penguin Group, Inc.
Release Date: May 11, 2004

Fifteen-year-old Colie has never fit in. First, it was because she was fat. Then, after she lost the weight, it was because of a reputation that she didn’t deserve. So when she’s sent to stay with her eccentric aunt Mira for the summer, Colie doesn’t expect too much. After all, why would anyone in Colby, North Carolina, want to bother with her when no one back home does?
But Colby turns out to be a nice surprise for Colie. Almost without trying, she lands herself a job at the Last Chance Bar and Grill. There she meets fellow waitresses Morgan and Isabel – two best friends who teach her what friendship is all about, and help her learn to appreciate who she really is.

Ever since reading Along for the Ride, I have loved Sarah Dessen, and this book is no exception. Each of her books take on real issues, that many people, if not all, can relate to. Even if you’ve never had problems like a character in her books, the way she writes makes you understand and feel what the character is feeling. There were times when I was close to tears while reading, just because I couldn’t stand the way that Colie was feeling – useless, friendless, etc.

I liked how Dessen didn’t focus on the guy, Norman, until the end. Colie was going through enough self-discovery without having to add a guy into the mix. However, their date at the end was VERY cute. I’m glad that it finally happened. Norman’s attitude and personality were perfect for Colie. Plus, his relationship with Mira was great – he was like the boy next door who helps the old lady next door with all the yard work. Mira’s eccentricities were hilarious, with all her little notes everywhere. But she had some really profound insights that can be applied to life, no matter who the reader is, which I appreciated.

Morgan and Isabel were especially important to the story, and to Colie. Morgan’s genuine kindness and motherliness was definitely nurturing for Colie, but it was the combination of that and Isabel’s rough-around-the-edges attitude and insight into Colie’s life that truly inspired a change in her. The way she could relate to Colie, that we find out in the end (even though I had an inkling what it was), made everything that Isabel ever said to Colie in the book that much more significant. The book may have been about self-discovery, but it was also about having other people – older, wiser people – there to help you along the way.

I loved this book – it was funny, sad, and contained a life lesson for everyone somewhere in its pages. It’s up to you to read it and find out, though!

~Yours Truly

**Note: I recommend this book to people ages 13 & up due to some profane language.